Tag Archives: Zuni

Skinner to Host an American Indian & Tribal Art Auction Online on January 6

Marlborough, Mass. – December 30, 2014– Skinner, Inc. will hold an auction of American Indian & Tribal Art—Online  beginning January 6, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. EST and concluding on January 15, 2015 at 4:00 p.m. EST. Ideal for both seasoned and new collectors, the sale features a variety of items ranging from Plains Indian beadwork and Navajo jewelry and textiles to New Guinea artifacts and prehistoric stone material.

Tribal Art

Tribal art offerings include several fine utilitarian items from New Guinea, including Lime containers made of bamboo, gourd, and bone (Lots 28, 29).  … Read More

Skinner to Spotlight American Indian & Ethnographic Art at Auction

BOSTON, MA – October 14, 2013 – Exceptional examples of Plains Indian art, as well as rare objects from the Northwest Coast, Northeast Coast, Southwest, Africa, Polynesia, and beyond will be available at Skinner, Inc.’s American Indian & Ethnographic Art auction, on November 9, 2013.

Plains Indian Material

An exceptional Sioux Beaded and Quilled Hide Shirt from the Charles Derby collection represents the auction’s top lot (lot 199, estimated at $150,000 to $250,000).… Read More

Rare and Evocative Plains Indian Art at Auction
Rare Plains Pony, Seed Bead, and Quilled Hide Shirt

Boston, Mass. – January 18, 2013 – Skinner, Inc. will host an auction of American Indian & Ethnographic Art on February 9th in its Boston gallery. Skinner is proud to offer more than 200 lots of evocative Plains Indian artifacts, including four rare pieces collected by the Burr family in 1855-1857. The February sale also features the Joseph J. Rivera collection, the largest group of Southwest historic pottery ever offered at Skinner, and two rare Eskimo masks.… Read More

Historic Southwest Pottery Guide: from Acoma to Zuni

Now is a good time to buy Southwest pottery. A large amount of material is coming onto the market, and for that reason you can easily find great, affordable pottery from the American Indian pueblos. Before you buy, it’s best to study the material and determine what appeals to you. Some people collect for rarity; others collect to decorate their Southwest-themed abodes.

Finely decorated pottery that was used by the people themselves is always very desirable. The rarest historic pottery is from Santa Ana. Because of their innovative designs and the fact that their pottery tradition ended at about the turn of the 20th century, a large Santa Ana olla could bring $100,000 or more.