Tag Archives: Polynesian art

The Polynesian Art of Tongan War Clubs

Tongan war clubs are weapons usually known by the term ‘akau, which means stave. Tongan clubs are one of the few instantly classic and easily identifiable artifacts from Polynesia. They were widely collected from the period of James Cook’s voyages in the 1770s onwards, and reflect the militaristic collecting interests of sailors and traders, as well as a vigorous demand for non-western weapons in the European curiosities markets.‘Akau, along with spears, were the principal weapons of war in Tonga up until the middle of the 19th century, despite the introduction of firearms from western sailors and traders from the late 18th century onwards.… Read More

Auction of Artifacts from Tribal Cultures Now Open for Bidding 

MARLBOROUGH, MA – July 5, 2018 – Skinner, Inc. is pleased to announce a Tribal Art online auction, with bidding open through July 11, 2018. With a breadth of material spanning the globe; tribal cultures from American Indian, pre-Columbian, African, Oceanic, South-East Asian, and more are available for bidding in an online auction format. 

The Tribal Art online auction includes significant artifacts from  including Inuit and Northwest Coast tribal groups; from the Amazon; a large number from Africa ranging from ceremonial face masks, figures, weapons and jewelry; a large Oceanic contingent of material from New Guinea jewelry to Polynesian pre-contact stone tools and weapons; and a group of Pre-Columbian ceramic figures and vessels.… Read More

Exceptional Plains Indian Art Stands Out at Auction

BOSTON, MA – August 11, 2014 – Exceptional Plains Indian clothing and beaded objects will be available at Skinner, Inc.’s American Indian & Ethnographic Art auction on September 6, 2014 in Boston, alongside tribal art from Africa, Melanesia, Polynesia, and Australia, pre-Colombian art, and objects from the Northeast woodlands and Northwest coast of North America. “Rare objects at a range of price points will catch the interest of both new and advanced collectors,” says Douglas Deihl, Director of American Indian & Ethnographic Art.… Read More