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Tag Archives: photographer

Works by 19th-century, Modern, and Contemporary Masters Featured in Fine Photographs Auction, January 27

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On Friday, January 27, Skinner will present its winter Prints & Photographs auction in Boston, beginning at 12 pm. The selection of fine photographs on offer features a range of 19th and 20th century works by such masters as Auguste Salzmann, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Alfred Stieglitz, Irving Penn, Nan Goldin, and others.

Francis Frith (British, 1822-1898) Street View in Cairo, 1858 (Lot 132, Estimate: $2,500-3,500)

Among the highlights is a group of works being sold to benefit the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA).… Read More

Skinner’s September Fine Prints & Photographs Auction to Celebrate Boston and New England Photography

Lot 103, estimated between $1,000-1,500, and Lot 104, $1,200-1,800

BOSTON, MASkinner, Inc. will present a strong selection of fine photographs for beginning and experienced collectors in its September 23, 2016, Fine Prints & Photographs auction, which opens for bidding at 12PM. The sale of 61 lots features works by modern and contemporary masters including Ansel Adams, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Walker Evans, and Annie Leibovitz in addition to a special themed section celebrating photography in Boston and New England.… Read More

John Beasley Greene and the Artistry
of 19th Century Photographic Processes

John Beasley Greene (American, 1832-1856)  River Bank, Algeria, 1855-56. (Lot 76, Estimate $3,000-$5,000)

I’m a bit of a process geek when it comes to nineteenth-century photography. Technology advanced in such rapid and interesting ways during the early years of the medium’s existence. Photographers were constantly experimenting with, combining, and improving upon formulas for making negatives and developing and fixing images. A good example of these innovations—a salt print (Lot 76, Estimate $3,000-5,000) made from a waxed paper negative by the French-born American archaeologist John Beasley Greene (1832-1856)—is one of the highlights of Skinner’s January 22 Fine Prints & Photographs auction.Read More

Photography (and Springtime!) in New York

Jim Campbell at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery.

Visitors to the fair.

Whether you are a nascent or seasoned collector, or simply interested in honing your visual eye, you can see a broad range of amazing photographs and photo-based work at the annual Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) Photography Show held in New York at the Park Avenue Armory every spring. Acting as the collective voice of the art photography dealers that make up its membership, AIPAD, according to the group’s mission statement, “is dedicated to creating and maintaining high standards in the business of exhibiting, buying and selling photographs as art.”

Celebrating its 35th year, the 2015 AIPAD Photography Show New York was held April 16-19 and featured 89 exhibitors from North America, Europe, Asia, and South America.… Read More

Working the Line: An Exhibit at Harvard Art Museums

David Taylor, Border Monument No. 36, 2008. Archival inkjet print. Courtesy of James Kelly Contemporary.

David Taylor, Border Monument No. 36, 2008. Archival inkjet print. Courtesy of James Kelly Contemporary.

If you enjoyed the recent National Public Radio series Borderland: Dispatches from the U.S.-Mexico Boundary, you might be interested in the work of Arizona-based photographer David Taylor currently on view at Harvard University’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

The exhibition, which I initiated when I worked as a curator at the Harvard Art Museums, presents Taylor’s two-part project Working the Line.… Read More

The Photography of Henri Cartier-Bresson

Cartier-Bresson had a lifelong love of art, literature, and travel. Like so many photographers, Cartier-Bresson’ interest in photography began in his youth with a Brownie box camera (I remember using my Mom’s Brownie when I was a kid). He had formal training as a painter, and studied with the Cubist painter André Lhote. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, life’s twists and turns took him to England and Côte d’Ivoire and eventually to Marseilles.