Tag Archives: modern architecture

Gallery Talk: Bauhaus Summers on Cape Cod

Juliet Kepes, Gyorgy Kepes, Connie Breuer and friends in Wellfleet, circa early 1960s. Image courtesy of Julie Kepes Stone. Join us: Bauhaus Summers on Cape Cod

presented by Peter McMahon

Starting in the late 1930s, in the back woods of Wellfleet, a group of self-taught American designers collaborated with some of Europe’s most influential avant garde architects to create the outer Cape’s unique modern houses. This illustrated presentation will explore this history, as well as current efforts to save a group of important abandoned houses, and to repurpose them as a platform for new creative work.Read More

Lecture | Modern Design by a Mid-Century New Englander

Modern Design by a Mid-Century New Englander

A Lecture by Lucretia Giese

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23 | RECEPTION 5PM | LECTURE 6PM

RSVP ONLINE

This talk looks at some of the forces shaping mid-century modern design through the work of one mid-century New England practitioner, Henry B. Hoover.  Hoover is known today as an architect.  Less known is Hoover’s design work, which manifests itself in three ways.  As a residential architect, Hoover designed numerous houses in New England, including the first Modern house in Lincoln, MA, and pieces of furniture for his clients. … Read More

The Burke House: Mid-Century Modern Architecture & Furnishings

The Mary Griggs Burke Estate includes the furnishings of the Burke house, on Centre Island in Oyster Bay, New York overlooking Long Island Sound. Designed and furnished by Boston architect Ben Thompson, the home was featured in the book: Design Research: The Store That Brought Modern Living To American Homes. In 1956, the magazine Architectural Record reviewed the home for its architecture and elaborate Japanese-style garden.

Mary Griggs Burke was best known for her passionate collecting of Japanese ceramics.… Read More

Art, Architecture, and Environment: Envisioning the Whole

Visiting Eliot Noyes’ home and the Philip Johnson Glass House last week brought to mind the saying, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” In each mid-century modern home, seeing the architecture, landscape, and objects all together stimulated my imagination and interested me far more than if I’d been presented each vase and table and painting separately in a museum.