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Anatolian Village Weaving | April 29 | Boston

Central Anatolian “Memling” Gul Rug, Turkey, c. 1850 (Lot 1, Estimate: $2,500-3,000)

Anatolian Village Weaving

 

A Lecture by Samy Rabinovic 

 
Sunday, April 29th

Samy Rabinovic was born in Istanbul in 1940, and grew up in a house filled with rugs (his uncle was Director of the Anglo-Persian Rug Company), but felt no particular attraction to them. His real passion at the time was chemistry. After obtaining an advanced degree in Polymer Sciences from the University of Massachusetts in 1969, Samy worked for Rohm and Haas (now owned by Dow Chemical) for many years, becoming head of Research and Development in their Plastics Division in France from 1975 through 1984.… Read More

Parker’s Revenge Revealed: Archaeology on a Revolutionary War Battlefield | April 25 | Marlborough

Image Courtesy of Don Troiani

Parker’s Revenge Revealed: Archaeology on a Revolutionary War Battlefield

A Lecture by Dr. Meg Watters

Wednesday, April 25, 6PM

On the morning April 19th, 1775, British troops marched from Boston to Concord, Massachusetts, to destroy supplies stockpiled in the town to form a provincial army. As the British soldiers reached the town of Lexington, militia had formed on the common. A shot was fired, and the British regulars fired into the militia killing eight and wounding ten.Read More

The Sputnik Years: Lecture By Kelly Beatty | November 1

The Sputnik Years

A Lecture by Kelly Beatty

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 | RECEPTION 5PM | LECTURE 6PM

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When a Russian rocket lofted Sputnik 1 into orbit on October 4, 1957, the worldwide reaction was a mixture of awe and apprehension. The Space Age—and the Space Race—had begun.

Kelly Beatty has been explaining the science and wonder of astronomy to the public since 1974. An award-winning writer and communicator, he specializes in planetary science and space exploration as Senior Contributing Editor for Sky & Telescope magazine.… Read More

The Worcester County Fowler | Lecture by Richard Colton | October 24

The Worcester County Fowler: Hunting Longarms Turned to War, 1750 to 1825

A Lecture by Richard Colton

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24 | RECEPTION 5PM | LECTURE 6PM

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By the mid-18th century, something remarkable occurred among a small network of artisans and gunsmiths in Worcester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Setting aside traditional British forms and decorative styles, they adopted distinctly French patterns of flintlock long smoothbore hunting guns.… Read More

Lecture | Mocha & Other Slipwares – A History

Mocha & Other Slipwares – A History

A Lecture by Jonathan Rickard

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 | RECEPTION 5PM | LECTURE 5:30PM

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Jonathan Rickard has always collected. As a child it was soda bottle caps. Later, it was cast iron mechanical banks. At a Skinner auction in the late 1960s, he spotted some ceramic vessels that were called mochaware. His design studies at MassArt had introduced him to the theories of the Bauhaus movement and to the color theories of Josef Albers.… Read More

Jewelry’s Power Couples | Lecture | June 22

 

Jewelry’s Power Couples

A Lecture by Toni Greenbaum

THURSDAY, JUNE 22 | RECEPTION 5PM | LECTURE 6PM

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Art historian Toni Greenbaum will discuss several notable modern and contemporary jewelers who are married to one another. Each captivating couple has a different story to tell of how they met and forged their respective careers, as well as what – if any – collaborative practices guided their oeuvres. Beginning with Sam and Carol Kramer, who offered “fantastic jewelry for people who are slightly mad” at their post-war Surrealist-inspired Greenwich Village shop, and ending with current “jewelry anarchists” Karl Fritsch and Lisa Walker, Greenbaum will discuss such international luminaries as Toza and Ruth Radakovich, Gijs Bakker and Emmy van Leersum, David Watkins and Wendy Ramshaw, Otto Künzli and Therese Hilbert, and David Bielander and Helen Britton.… Read More

Charles Prendergast: A Glimpse of Heaven | A Lecture by Carol Clark | May 17

Charles E. Prendergast, Untitled (Vase with Flowers and Birds) (Lot 382, Estimate $30,000-50,000)

Charles Prendergast: A Glimpse of Heaven

A Lecture by Carol Clark

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17

RECEPTION 5:30PM | LECTURE 6PM

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Carol Clark will discuss the distinctive career of Charles Prendergast (1863-1948) who, along with his brother Maurice, participated in key aesthetic movements of the first half of the 20th century. Inspired by a wide range of art from the past, such as Persian miniatures and Egyptian reliefs, and by folk and modern painting, Charles’s contribution as a frame maker and his creation of fewer than 125 carved, painted, and gilded panels offer insight into an exciting moment in American art.… Read More

Boston Teas and Baskets That Please | Lecture | May 4

Courtesy of the Department of the Interior Museum, Washington, DC

Boston Teas and Baskets That Please

A Lecture by Sarah Peabody Turnbaugh

THURSDAY, MAY 4 | RECEPTION 5:30PM | LECTURE 6PM

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Sarah Peabody Turnbaugh is a specialist and scholar of American Indian basketry who is retired from museum administrative and teaching positions. For over forty years, she and her husband and colleague William Turnbaugh, Ph.D., have written about various American Indian arts.… Read More

Clocks Gallery Talk | April 27

Gallery Talk with Richard Ketchen, Clock & Scientific Instrument Conservator

THURSDAY, APRIL 27 | RECEPTION 5PM, GALLERY TALK 6PM

Richard Ketchen, of Carlisle, Massachusetts, will lead a gallery walk on Fasoldt clocks and the Holtzapffel ornamental turning lathe and rose engine featured in this sale. A leading clock and scientific instrument conservator, Richard is uniquely qualified to speak on these diverse subjects. Ketchen has restored a large and diverse collection of Fasoldt timekeepers and has made one from scratch to better understand the genius of the original maker.… Read More

Lecture | Flower/Power: The Legacy of Persian Carpets

 

Flower/Power: The Legacy of Persian Carpets

A Lecture by Julia Bailey

SUNDAY APRIL, 23 | RECEPTION 2:30PM | LECTURE 3PM

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Most Persian rugs made before the sixteenth century are now lost; our best idea of what they looked like comes from manuscript paintings. During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, according to these paintings, rugs generally exhibited small-scale, abstract, geometric designs. But during the sixteenth century, under Safavid rule, carpets gained a new, more naturalistic vocabulary, representing both courtly life on earth and a hoped-for afterlife in a tree- and flower-filled garden paradise.… Read More

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