Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: Kerry Shrives

5 Tips for Bidding with Success in Online Auctions

Famille Jaune Bowl, China, with lotus scrolling alternating with four characters, (Estimate $200-300; Sold for $24,600)

Believe it or not, Skinner held its first online-only auctions in 1999. At the time, bidders experienced a platform built on an emerging technology.  Fast-forward to 2018, and it’s hard to find a collector or even occasional buyer who hasn’t participated in online auctions.

The main feature of an online-only auction is that bidding takes place online over an extended period of time – as a bidder, there is no need to spend hours in a saleroom waiting for the lot(s) you are interested in to come on the block.… Read More

Let Skinner Lot Alert Help you Save Time Searching for Fine Art, Antiques and Collectibles at Auction

Keeping up with what is being offered at auction can be challenging. Over 50 auctions take place in Massachusetts each year, meaning that there are tens of thousands of antiques and collectibles being bought and sold. How can one person keep track of them all and avoid missing out on the interesting, possibly obscure, or rare antique they’re seeking?

Mt. Kearsarge Annual Fundraiser | November 3 & 4

The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum will be hosting their Annual Fundraiser with  Antiques Appraisal Events on Friday, November 3 and Saturday, November 4, 2017.

On Friday, November 3rd, participants will enjoy a Skinner Auctioneers and Appraisers event called “What’s It Worth?”  This event is both entertaining and educational for those interested in the history and the value of antiques. You may bring 3 treasures to the museum for evaluation and verbal appraisal! … Read More

Country Americana and Studio Artwork at Skinner Marlborough in November

Shaker Cherry Work Counter, early 19th century (Lot 611, Estimate $4,000-$6,000)

MARLBOROUGH, MA – November 14, 2014 – Skinner is hosting a live auction of Country Americana in its Marlborough, MA Gallery on Thursday, November 20th at 10:00 a.m. and an online only auction of Studio Artwork with bidding open from November 13th through the 21st. Both auctions may be viewed in person at the Marlborough Gallery on November 18th and 19th or online at any time.… Read More

How to Buy American Victorian Furniture: A Guide for New Collectors

Victorian Furniture | Ebonized Mahogany Chair

I’m seeing a trend in the Boston area when it comes to Victorian homes. Home-buying opportunities abound, and I’ve met more than a few “young collectors” who speak admiringly of the ornate woodwork, beautiful hardwood floors and unique build-ins of their new Victorian homes. Although they realize they purchased gems, what they might not have thought about is how affordable it is to furnish their new homes with period designs.

I’ve overheard it said that Victorian antiques and Boston don’t agree – but that’s certainly not true in my experience. New York City housed the biggest powerhouses of design and manufacture in latter part of the 19th century, including Herter Brothers and Pottier & Stymus, but Boston had plenty of purchasing power, and museums and collections are plentiful here. Most importantly for collectors, great buys can be had if you know what to look for.

How to Find the Perfect Passover Haggadah for your Seder

Sold for $450,000: Seder Haggadah shel Pesach, Pressburg, copied and illustrated by Aaron Wolf Herlingen, 1735

Each Passover, Jews around the world fulfill the commandment to retell the Israelites’ liberation from slavery in Egypt. In Hebrew, the word for this telling is Haggadah (plural: Haggadot), and the name of the ritual meal is Seder.

A Haggadah text supplies an outline of the order of the Seder along with poetry and songs. However, like much Jewish ceremonial art, each Haggadah may have its own distinct and fascinating characteristics.… Read More

Skinner Announces Strong Results from October Auction of Fine Judaica

Sold for $450,000: Seder Haggadah shel Pesach, Pressburg, copied and illustrated by Aaron Wolf Herlingen, 1735

BOSTON, MA – October 24, 2013 – Skinner, Inc. achieved exceptional results from its small but robust auction of Fine Judaica on October 3rd. The auction, featuring 178 lots, grossed a total of $660,439.70. Drawing buyers from around the world, this sale underscored Skinner as a leading auctioneer of Jewish ceremonial items, Torah ornaments, artwork, books and more.… Read More

Fine Judaica Auction Features Items from the Personal Collection of Nahum Goldmann

A collection of works by Ilya Schor will also be presented

BOSTON, Mass. – September 19, 2013 – Skinner, Inc. will host an auction of Fine Judaica on October 3rd in its Boston Gallery. The sale features property from the estate of Nahum Goldmann, artwork by Ilya Schor, silver ceremonial items, Torah ornaments, as well Jewish art and books.

Property from the Estate of Nahum Goldmann

Seder Haggadah shel Pesach, Pressburg, copied and illustrated by Aaron Wolf Herlingen, 1735, (Lot 14, Estimate $200,000-$300,000)

Skinner is pleased to offer items from the personal collection of Nahum Goldmann (1895-1982), one of the most prominent leaders of the Jewish people and the Zionist movement in the 20th century.… Read More

What are Antiques Worth? A Guide to the Collecting Market in 2013

Commonplace porcelain and glass items generally do not perform well at auction

“You don’t know until you ask,” a client told me the other day. I had just told her that her family’s antiques were not valuable enough to perform well at auction. In the antiques appraisal and auction business, people often show up with entire truck loads of antique items that they hope to auction. I do regularly find rare and valuable items, but just as often I have to say, “no, thank you” to everything.… Read More

36 Hours with Antiques Roadshow in Cincinnati, Ohio: The Queen of the West

Cincinnati, Ohio was the fourth stop in the Summer 2012 tour of Antiques Roadshow. This summer is season 17 for me, and while I’ve lost count of the cities I’ve traveled to over the years — I’m guessing nearly 60 — I always appreciate the opportunity to discover something about the art, architecture and design of the locale.

On Thursday night I represented Antiques Roadshow at a station event at the Cincinnati Museum Center. Formerly the railroad’s Union Terminal (built 1929-1933), the stunning Art Deco building is a National Historic Landmark. The central rotunda showcases a series of fabulous mosaics by Winold Reiss (1886-1953), commissioned in 1932 to depict the history of Cincinnati and its industries. Scenes of working Americans, the history of passenger transportation, and westward expansion all help to tell the story of how Cincinnati was transformed from a frontier town to a gateway city. I also peeked through the windows at the Rookwood Ice Cream Parlor, originally laid out in 1931-33 as a tea room. Famous for their art pottery, Rookwood created their last-known tile installation here.

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