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Tag Archives: Kathy Wong

Authenticating a Picasso Drawing

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973), Femme retenant son peignoir, c. 1923 (Lot 601, Estimate $30,000-$50,000)

Provenance research can be like looking for a needle in a haystack, where sometimes what you find is a strong thread. Such was the case with a Picasso drawing that will be sold on May 16, 2014 in the American & European Works of Art auction at Skinner in Boston.

George Leslie Stout, the Fogg Art Museum’s first conservation department head, articulated the best practices for art authentication as a “three-legged stool,” and his model is still generally accepted today.… Read More

AD 20/21 in Boston, Part II: From Graffiti Art to the One Shot Stool

As an art appraiser and appreciator, I’ve always enjoyed AD 20/21: Art & Design of the 20th & 21at Centuries. This year, the show has moved beyond just modern design and prints to feature more contemporary art than I’ve seen in the past. The show is open from March 15– 18, 2012 at the Boston Center for the Arts

Blooms for Books

Several months ago, Skinner art appraiser Kathy Wong agreed to arrange all of the flowers for a friend’s wedding. I know you’re wondering what this has to do with antiques and auctions, but just stay with me for a minute. The friend happens to be a Skinner colleague, so this past fall we have all enjoyed watching the process as Kathy brought in ideas to show to the bride-to-be: designs for table arrangements, bouquets, boutonnières, and more.

Bringing Forgotten History to Light: Cataloguing a Walter Launt Palmer Painting

One of the distinct joys of being a fine art appraiser and cataloguer is getting to physically handle a work and bring its forgotten history to light. When we are lucky, the owner provides documentation for provenance or context. More often than not, what we work with are anecdotes that we must verify or rule out independently. At the heart of cataloguing is looking at a work objectively and asking the fundamental question “What does that mean?” of any inscriptions or marks.

Steel, Stones, and Smoke: Art Appraisers Tour Art Basel Miami Beach

Last week, I had the opportunity to travel to Florida for one of the year’s most spectacular art shows: Art Basel Miami Beach. I spent the first part of the trip with fellow art appraiser Kathy Wong, and then my husband and 7-year-old son joined me as traveling companions. In addition to spotting famous and emerging artists (Julian Schnabel, Orlan, the controversial Mr. Brainwash, and Marina Abramovic, to name a few), we snapped photos of many pieces of art that struck us as beautiful, original, shocking, or thought-provoking. You can view the full gallery on the American & European Works of Art Facebook page.

An Art Museum Fantasy Road Trip, Part I: A Journey through Spain

Winter has arrived in New England, and I’m dreaming of the warm, turquoise waters of the Spanish Costa Brava. I completely fell in love with Barcelona this summer, for its blending of art and architecture as well as high and low culture. Antoni Gaudi left his visionary mark on the city in the late 19th century, and Barcelona has continued to think big with its monumental sculpture, murals, and street art.

As much as I would love to re-explore Barcelona, I dream of exploring other parts of the country. If I could go anywhere in Spain right now, these would be my top five art destinations.

Fine Art and Creative Reuse: Robert Rauschenberg's Work

Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008), Tampa Clay Piece, 1972. Est. $1,800-2,200

Next time you come across an empty cardboard box, take a close look at it before you find a trash can– or better yet, a recycling bin. Does the box look like art?

It very well could be considered fine art, especially by someone like artist Robert Rauschenberg.

“Tampa Clay Piece” (1972) isn’t actually made out of cardboard. This work is a fired and silkscreened ceramic, but it derives from Robert Rauschenberg’s long-standing practice of creative reuse.… Read More