Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: Italian violins

Perfect pitch: Skinner’s Fine Musical Instruments Auctions hit the high notes, from classic violins to groovy guitars.

Skinner Inc.’s Department of Fine Musical Instruments will offer two auctions this month. Parts of the J. Geils collection, from the estate of the Grammy-nominated rock musician, will be included in both.

Auction 3051B, Fine Musical Instruments, will be held in the Boston gallery, 63 Park Plaza, at 12 PM on Sunday, November 19. It will feature classical and vintage instruments and related music material. Included will be highlights from the estate of J.… Read More

Italian Violins Lead Skinner Fine Musical Instruments Auction, May 14

Italian Violin, Carlo Ferdinando Landolfi, Milan, c. 1772 (Lot 198, Estimate: $150,000-200,000)

BOSTON, MA Skinner, Inc. is pleased to announce its first Fine Musical Instruments auction of 2017, taking place in Boston on Sunday, May 14 at 12PM. This auction features 328 lots, including a selection of fretted, wind, and bowed instruments and related books, along with several bass guitars from the estate of legendary bassist and Berklee College of Music professor, Victor Bailey.… Read More

Dall’ Aglio and the Mantua School of Fine Violins

Between the old Mantua school, represented by Peter Guarneri, Camillo Camilli, and Tomasso Balestrieri, and the new Mantua school represented by Stefano Scarampella, the only notable maker working in Mantua in the early 19th century seems to be Giuseppe Dall’ Aglio.

A More Affordable Italian Violin: The Neapolitan School

For over a century, modern string players have found that Italian violins from Naples can satisfy the need for a first professional quality instrument at a fraction of the price of those by Northern Italian makers. Many, including soloists, continue to use the same Neapolitan violin throughout their careers without needing to upgrade to something older and more expensive.

The Mantua School, New and Old: Part 2

In 1886, Stefano Scarampella arrived in Mantua from nearby Brescia and established himself as a full-time maker two years later. His father had been an amateur builder, and his brother Giuseppe was trained in Nice and Florence. When Giuseppe died in 1902, Stefano inherited his tools and plunged himself a period of artistic isolation and intense creativity.

The Mantua School, New and Old: Part 1

By the early 17th century, Mantua had become a strong cultural center in post-Renaissance Italy, and its new wealth and freer attitude towards secular music attracted musical talent like composer Claudio Monteverdi away from the more parochial Cremona, barely 30 miles to the west.