Tag Archives: folk art auction

The Undeniable Appeal of Folk Art

Folk art can appeal in different and often unexpected ways, and I think that surprise element is what draws me to it most. That we don’t often know a lot about its imaginative makers adds to the intrigue.

Folk Art Fish Weathervane, America, mid-20th century (Lot 2514, Estimate: $300-500)

A 20th century figure of a fish made from a bowling pin is a great example of the unexpected nature of folk art. The pin, which has clearly been used, shows the wear from the heavy contact it received from bowling balls over its years in its first life, has been altered to look like a fish, in much the way that a 19th century folk artist saw a tree root and fashioned a snake.… Read More

First Tuesday | June 4 | Marlborough

Join us for First Tuesday in Marlborough

Tuesday, June 4 | 1:30PM – 4PM

Specialists Robin S.R. Starr, Karen Keane, Jonathan Dowling & Kaitlin Shinnick will be on hand to evaluate items and accept consignments for upcoming auctions.

Experts Available in June:

Robin S.R. Starr – Director of American & European Works of Art, will be on-hand to evaluate paintings, prints, sculpture, and photography for upcoming auctions. She is looking forward to seeing examples by listed, sought-after artists, as well as iconic works of fine art photography from the 19th through 21st centuries, with market interest over $1000.… Read More

What to Collect: Contemporary Folk Art

The objects of everyday life, folk art, are the carved and decorated objects (weathervanes, whirligigs, and paintings) often made outside of urban areas by itinerant or self-taught artists and craftspeople. These naive and sometimes primitive objects are often colorful, highly individual and whimsical interpretations of utilitarian or decorative forms. A simple box can be transformed by colorful paint or wind-driven whirligigs can be fashioned in endless variation.… Read More

A Tale of Two Portraits: A Previously Undiscovered Folk Art Painting Brings $252,000 at Auction

I’ve been an appraiser on Antiques Roadshow since the very first episode in Concord, Massachusetts  eighteen  years ago. Now, the Emmy® Award nominated show attracts thousands of people to events in cities around the country. I love meeting these people and seeing what keepsakes they treasure. Some of the items have only sentimental value, but occasionally I find items of real aesthetic or historic value. These are the special objects that have inspired many to take another look at things tucked away in attics and basements.… Read More