Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: fine silver auction

Fairytales & Silver: The Hanau Region of Germany

From the monumental Tiffany centerpiece to the towering Polish tureen on stand and striking Russian Kovsh, the January 12 Fine Silver auction features some of the most imposing pieces I have worked with. While I have too many favorites to list, one such piece that caught my eye was the German sleigh-form centerpiece (Lot 206). Though my interest may stem from daydreams of this piece in the center of a holiday table setting, this impressive sleigh highlights some interesting aspects of the Hanau region of silver production as a whole.… Read More

Exploring Early American and English Silver at Colonial Williamsburg

Colonial Williamsburg organized a symposium during the first weekend of May this year titled, “A Handsome Cupboard of Plate Revealed: Early American and English Silver.” Hosted by the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg, the symposium was held in conjunction with the opening of an exhibition of silver from the Cahn Collection and featured a variety of renowned speakers. The discussions ranged from how and where silver is mined to the influence of Huguenot craftsmen on 18th century silver in England and America.… Read More

Exploration, Adventure, and Endurance Part II: Henry F. Sullivan’s English Channel Swim

The press described it as “the greatest feat of endurance of all time.” Henry F. Sullivan had become the first American, and only the third person ever, to swim across the English Channel. His feat established the world’s endurance record and the world’s breast stroke record, and earned him a stunning silver trophy.

Exploration, Adventure, and Endurance Part I: How to Earn a Three-foot-tall Sterling Silver Trophy

This monumental George V sterling silver trophy made by Elkington & Co. is an intriguing relic of the golden age of achievement, adventure, and historic firsts. Known as “The Alexander Channel Cup,” it is a stunning piece of silversmithing that measures over three feet in height — only 2 feet shorter than me. The trophy was presented to Massachusetts native Henry F. Sullivan in 1923 as a prize for becoming the first American to swim the English Channel.