Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: David Wood

Skeleton Clock, New England Tall Clocks Lead Skinner’s April Auction of Clocks, Watches & Scientific Instruments

Louis E. Meyer 'Grand Complication' Skeleton Clock

Louis E. Meyer ‘Grand Complication’ Skeleton Clock, St. Charles, Missouri, 1876 (Lot 138, Estimate $20,000-$40,000)

MARLBOROUGH, MA – Skinner, Inc.’s spring auction of Clocks, Watches & Scientific Instruments will offer a broad range of outstanding and affordable technical collectibles for both the beginning and advanced collector. To be held on Friday, April 29 at 10AM in Skinner’s Marlborough gallery, the sale will present over 350 carefully curated lots, many of them drawn from private collections from across the country.… Read More

The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775

Guest blog post by David F. Wood, Curator, Concord Museum. The Shot Heard Round the World:  April 19, 1775 will be on view at the Concord Museum through September 21, 2014. 

Lantern, Boston, about 1775. Courtesy of the Concord Museum

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled Here once the embattled farmers stood And fired the shot heard round the world”

When Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote this famous stanza, he was referring specifically to events that occurred at Concord’s North Bridge on April 19, 1775.… Read More

Massachusetts Furniture: The Life and Times of Cabinetmaker William Munroe

Guest blog post by David Wood, Curator, Concord Museum

Account Book No. 2; 1816-1825, William Munroe (1778-1861); Gift of Mr. Charles P. Munroe and Mr. William M. Munroe; Concord Museum. William Munroe’s first and second account books are on view in the special exhibition.

I’ve spent a good part of the last year working on the exhibit: The Best Workman in the Shop:  Cabinetmaker William Munroe of Concord, and during my research I’ve gained insight into Munroe’s accomplishments as well as his frustrations.… Read More

Crowdsourcing a Collection: Local Voices and Stories at the Concord Museum

Over the last six months, as part of the Concord Museum’s 125th anniversary exhibition, Crowdsourcing a Collection, local citizens, historians, teachers, artists, public servants, sister institutions, and five voices from Concord’s past have chosen objects from the Museum’s collection that held meaning for them. Their responses are varied, but all are history in the first person.