Tag Archives: daguerreotypes

American & European Art takes Center Stage at Skinner, May 16

BOSTON, MA – April 29, 2014 Skinner, Inc.  is pleased to offer a tremendous selection of fine works during its May 16th auction of American & European Works of Art and American & European Prints & Photography.

The two-part auction will feature a robust offering of modern and contemporary paintings – including an institutional collection of large-scale Polish works – as well as works on paper by iconic artists from Picasso to Miró.… Read More

May 15 | Daguerreotype Lecture

Thursday, May 15, 2014

REGISTER

Reception 5:30PM Lecture 6PM

Join Michelle Lamunière, Photography Specialist, for a presentation on the daguerreotype process with highlights from a New England collection. Held in conjunction with the  American & European Works of Art and the Prints & Photography preview and auctions.

Skinner Boston Gallery 63 Park Plaza Boston, MA 02116

Daguerreotype Portraits

Contact 508-970-3240 events@skinnerinc.comRead More

Daguerreotypes, Ambrotypes & Tintypes: The Rise of Early Photography

Daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes were the first three early photographic processes to gain widespread popularity. Developed in the mid-to-late 19th century, each successive technique improved upon the others in availability, affordability, and processing speed. Despite these improvements, each process produced a unique, one-of-a kind image–the only one!

Daguerreotypes Part II: Highlights of the Early Photography Collection of Rod MacKenzie

On October 30, 2011, Skinner will offer the first part of the Early Photography collection of Rod MacKenzie in our American Furniture & Decorative Arts auction. Read Part I of this series to learn more about Rod MacKenzie’s sophisticated taste as a collector. MacKenzie’s extensive knowledge of American history, particularly of the Civil War, is represented by dozens of extraordinary images of military officers and soldiers. The collection includes portraits of soldiers of all types: officers, dashing men in uniform, and images of heart-breakingly young men headed off to war. In looking at these images, we feel tantalizingly close to the battlefield and to the figures taking part in military history. Notes tucked behind case liners, such as “taken at Newbern, No. Carolina 1863 WLW Private C. E. 44th Mass,” bring us in even closer.

Daguerreotypes Part I: Haunting, Beautiful, and Storied Pictures in the Early Photography Collection of Rod MacKenzie

Daguerreotypes are a reminder of a time when photography was very different from the “point-and-shoot” instant pictures of today. Now, you carry a camera in the cell phone in your back pocket everywhere you go. Then, photographers were purveyors of state-of-the-art technology.

In fact, the 19th century photographers who made these long-exposure images were referred to as daguerrean artists, and quickly supplanted the portrait painters of the day. The artists “images,” particularly daguerreotypes, were valued for their clarity and honesty in representation.