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Tag Archives: Consignment FAQ

Sell This at Auction! 3 Strong Performers in the American Art and Antiques Appraisal Market

The American antiques market has recently seen a strong comeback from previous seasons. While collecting trends come and go, some objects always find favor with bidders and consistently hold their value. It’s good to know what’s hot at auction right now; it’s better to know what remains popular year after year. That’s your best bet for selling auction-ready property and netting the highest price possible, no matter what the collecting climate.

Three Expert Insights: Quality Details

Quality in antiques and collectibles can stem from fine workmanship or exquisite materials. Skinner experts and appraisers have weighed in on these aspects of quality in the two previous posts. However, there is yet one more major theme when it comes to quality: detail.

As Executive Vice President Stephen Fletcher puts it, “It’s like buying a car.” You could be looking at two identical models, and one has a walnut interior, gps, and a sunroof, while the other has nothing special.… Read More

5 Expert Insights: Quality Materials

No one will argue that quality matters in buying and selling antiques and art objects. The trouble is, the characteristics that make one piece quality and another piece mediocre are often subtle. Skinner experts and appraisers offer their insights, stemming from years of experience, into what kinds of materials mean quality. Let’s take a look at how to recognize quality in jade, wine, Native American art, furniture, and metal sculpture.

5 Expert Insights: Quality Workmanship

Quality. This one word can make the difference between a value in the thousands or tens of thousands of dollars when it comes to art and antiques. Advice like “buy high-quality” or “quality never loses value” floats around the antiques business, but what does quality really mean?

Consignment and Beyond: The Quest to Authenticate a Frieseke Painting

I walked into the room, and before me on the table was a softly lit impressionist landscape depicting an olive grove with distant red-roofed houses. A French scene; southern France. The signature seemed to read “F.C. Frieseke”, and stylistically the painting was in the right ball park. Frederick Carl Frieseke was an American Impressionist who worked in France.

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