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Tag Archives: Concord Museum

Archaeology at Minuteman Historical National Park: The Parker’s Revenge Project

As a child growing up in the town of Concord, Massachusetts, I have always had a passion for the history and material culture of the events leading up to the start of the American Revolution. Years ago, I began going to local historical societies trying to find new documentation, as well as objects with a solid provenance to this period. Last year, I had the wonderful opportunity to look into the ground and see if we could find the location of the spot that the Lexington militia arrived on the Battle Road on April 19th 1775 to attack the retreating British column on their return from Concord.… Read More

Uncovering the History of Sleep at the Concord Museum

Guest blog post by the Concord Museum. Behind Closed Doors: Asleep in New England and Good Night, Sleep Tight: Art from Children’s Literature opens on Friday, October 10, 2014 and will be up through March 23, 2015 at the Concord Museum. 

Sleep is universal. We need it to survive, and people spend approximately one third of their lives in bed. Yet nobody, generally, talks about sleep. The Concord Museum aims to begin this conversation with two upcoming exhibitions that showcase material culture related to sleep.… Read More

Revolutionary War History: The Musterfield Flints

At about 9:00 A.M. on the morning of April 19th, 1775, approximately 450 men from Concord and the neighboring towns of Acton, Lincoln, Bedford, and Westford congregated on a rising pasture above the North Bridge. Capt. David Brown, one of the captains of Concord’s two minute companies, happened to own the pasture, which had a good view of the bridge. In the nearby town of Lexington, 700 British grenadiers and light infantry had arrived to look for large quantities of hidden military supplies and arms.

The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775

Guest blog post by David F. Wood, Curator, Concord Museum. The Shot Heard Round the World:  April 19, 1775 will be on view at the Concord Museum through September 21, 2014. 

“By the rude bridge that arched the flood Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled Here once the embattled farmers stood And fired the shot heard round the world”

When Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote this famous stanza, he was referring specifically to events that occurred at Concord’s North Bridge on April 19, 1775.… Read More

American Revolutionary War History: What Happened to the Original North Bridge?

On April 19, 1775, minutemen and militia faced off with British regulars at the North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts. This day would turn out to be the “spark” that ignited the American Revolution.

Two hundred years later, I was a 9-year-old attending the Ripley School in Concord. During a bicentennial ceremony, I received a small block of wood, and so did all of the other students at the school. Our teacher told us that these pieces of wood were remnants of the North Bridge.… Read More

The Puzzle of the Royal Artillery Pouch: A Relic of the Revolutionary War

You never know what you will find while doing research. In November 2010, I was at the Arlington Historical Society, studying the events of April 19th, 1775 that sparked the Revolutionary war in America. The Museum Director asked me if I was interested in seeing a British belt which had purportedly been taken on April 19th during the British retreat through West Cambridge, MA (now the city of Arlington). As soon as she opened the box, I realized it was not a belt, but a Royal Artillery cartridge pouch flap and strap, missing the leather pouch, wooden cartridge block, and brass insignia.… Read More

Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture Exhibitions and Events

Skinner is proud to provide financial underwriting and in-kind support for exhibitions presented as part of this landmark project.

Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture unites eleven institutions in an unprecedented collaboration highlighting Massachusetts furniture making, from the 1600s to the present day, through a series of craft demonstrations, workshops, symposia, lectures, and much more. Now through Spring 2015, there are a multitude of exhibitions and events organized by participating institutions.… Read More

Skinner Provides Special Support for Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture Exhibitions

BOSTON, Mass. – September 13, 2013Skinner, Inc. is proud to announce its sponsorship of Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture. Through the sponsorship, Skinner is providing financial underwriting as well as in-kind support for the exhibitions presented by the participating institutions in the Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture project, including the Concord Museum, the Fuller Craft Museum, Historic Deerfield, the Massachusetts Historical Society, Old Sturbridge Village, and the Peabody Essex Museum.… Read More

How the Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture Collaboration Began

Guest post by Brock Jobe, Professor of American Decorative Arts, Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library

Who doesn’t love furniture? It can be practical or frivolous, plain or posh, historic or contemporary, but ultimately it is so essential.  Furniture surrounds us. Without it, life would certainly be more of a struggle. Consider the challenges of writing this blog without a chair and a table. How long can one stand, hold a computer in one hand, and type with the other?… Read More

Massachusetts Furniture: The Life and Times of Cabinetmaker William Munroe

Guest blog post by David Wood, Curator, Concord Museum

I’ve spent a good part of the last year working on the exhibit: The Best Workman in the Shop:  Cabinetmaker William Munroe of Concord, and during my research I’ve gained insight into Munroe’s accomplishments as well as his frustrations.

William Munroe’s account books and autobiography give an inside look at the life of an apprentice cabinetmaker in Federal Boston that can be found nowhere else.… Read More

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