Tag Archives: Chinese pottery

The Enduring Beauty of Tomb Pottery

It is often said that Chinese collectors are loath to buy works from tombs for fear of disturbing the spirits of their ancestors. In fact, nothing is further from the truth. Throughout millennia, farmers relished digging for buried objects found in countless surrounding tombs, as much as they did digging for their crops. Until recent laws passed by the Chinese government prohibiting the sale of burial objects, the market for this material was lucrative.Read More

From Han to Eternity: The Beauty and Value of Chinese Tomb Pottery

In China, ancient burial sites commonly included tomb pottery. China’s tradition of pottery-making began in ancient times well before the Han dynasty, but by this time, improvements to pottery-making techniques allowed for extensive production of items for both daily and ceremonial use. These sophisticated new techniques eventually led to the three-colored glazed-ware (sancai) of the Tang dynasty as well as low-fired glazed-wares of the Ming and Qing dynasties.… Read More

April 25 | Asian Works of Art Reception

Friday, April 25, 2014 at 5-7PM

Join us for a reception

The Asian Works of Art Department  is pleased to invite you to a reception during our auction preview featuring The Estate of Peter L. Rosenberg.

Judith Dowling, Department Director, will be available to answer all your questions about  the upcoming auction.

Skinner Boston Gallery 63 Park Plaza Boston, MA 02116

AUCTION INFORMATION

The Estate of  Peter L. RosenbergRead More

From Han to Eternity: The Beauty and Value of Chinese Tomb Pottery

In China, during the Han dynasty (206 BC through AD 220), burials commonly included tomb pottery. China’s tradition of pottery-making began in ancient times well before the Han dynasty, but by this time, improvements to pottery-making techniques allowed for extensive production of items for both daily and ceremonial use. These sophisticated new techniques eventually led to the three-colored glazed-ware (sancai) of the Tang dynasty as well as low-fired glazed-wares of the Ming and Qing dynasties.… Read More