Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: british ceramics

Highlights from Skinner’s January 12th European Furniture & Decorative Arts Auction

Framed Stained Glass Panel of a Watery Landscape, early 20th century, in the manner of Duffner and Kimberly, (Lot 313, Estimate $5,000-7,000)

BOSTON, MA – Skinner, Inc. will present an auction of European Furniture & Decorative Arts in its Boston Gallery on Friday, January 12th. With over 600 lots on offer, the auction will feature an expansive selection of fine silver as well as European furniture and decorative arts of the 17th through early 20th centuries.… Read More

Country Americana and Studio Art online at Skinner in October

James Eaton Polychrome Metal Weathervane Sculpture, America, 2002 (Lot 4, Estimate: $800-1,200)

BOSTON, MA – Skinner is hosting a live auction featuring Country Americana on Thursday, November 17 and a Studio Art online auction November 10 through November 18. Interested bidders are invited to view items and meet with specialists in person on November 15 and November 16 or anytime online.

Highlights featured in Country Americana on November 17:

♦ A selection of carved polychrome contemporary folk art, including historical and whimsical figures and weathervanes.… Read More

Preview and Bid in Live and Online Auctions at Skinner Marlborough in March

Brown and Green ‘New York Beauty’ Variant Patchwork Quilt, late 19th century (Lot 112, Estimate $800-$1,200)

Discovery Country Americana live and Jewelry & Silver online February 4th through 12th

MARLBOROUGH, MA – March 4, 2016 – Skinner is hosting a live auction of Country Americana on Thursday, March 10 and an online-only auction of Jewelry & Silver from March 3 through 11. Bidders are invited to view items and meet with specialists in person on March 8 and 9, or anytime online.… Read More

Minton’s Victorian Majolica

Victorian majolica was produced in Britain by at least twenty-five to thirty manufacturers, including major potteries such as Wedgwood and George Jones, from the 1850s right through until the turn of the twentieth century. The French, Germans and Americans also manufactured their own majolica, with little similarities in style and enameling to their British counterparts.