Skinner Inc.

Auctioneers and Appraisers

Tag Archives: book expert

Books in Movies: Binding for Little Women

Fine Books & Manuscripts Director Devon Eastland discusses bookbinding for the set of Little Women

Thursday, November 14

Join us for Devon Eastland‘s talk on the process of collaborating with filmmakers to create and source period appropriate journals, sketchbooks, portfolios, printed books, and other bibliophilic material for the latest film version of Little Women, to be released Christmas 2019.

5:30PM reception | 6PM presentation

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SKINNER BOSTON63 Park Plaza, Boston

This event is held in conjunction with the November 11-17 Fine Books & Manuscripts online auction.… Read More

Boston Bookbinding Demonstration

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Reception: 5:30PM | Presentation: 6PM

Join Fine Books & Manuscripts specialist Devon Eastland for a demonstration of bookbinding techniques, restoration treatments and a discussion of approaches to repair with examples. See books from the inside out and bring your questions. Devon has worked in the field of restoration for more than twenty years. Repair a chair and sit down, fix a book and read!… Read More

Making Books for Movies: A Book Appraiser’s Glimpse of Hollywood

The movie R.I.P.D. opens today, and I’ll be there in the theater hoping to catch a glimpse of a single prop: a book that I made. This isn’t just any book – it’s 3 x 2 feet and weighs over 100 pounds! I made the book two years ago, and now I’ll find out if the book made the cut in the final film.

Meet the Experts: Devon Gray, Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts, Part II

The Adventures of a Rare Book Expert

Devon Gray is the new Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts at Skinner. Read part I, How to Fall in Love with Medieval Manuscripts, then read on for some of Devon’s favorite discoveries from her years buying and selling rare books.

What do you love most about books?

The timelessness of them. We use books exactly the way they were intended to be used, whether new or old. You pick up a manuscript from 1350, open it, and flip through the pages in exactly the same way as the first reader did several hundred years ago.… Read More