Tag Archives: Auction Highlights

Portrait of an Artist Not Necessarily as a Young Man…Or Woman…

The January 26th auction of American & European Works of Art at Skinner features some delightful and surprising takes on portraits of artists.

Traditionally, through fine prints, photographs, sketches, and oils, artists have captured likenesses of their circles, their friends, students, and mentors. Some may not resonate immediately as portraits of artists, appealing as sensitive portrayals of individual characters without any clues to their professions.… Read More

Fine Oriental Rugs and Carpets Gallery Walk
Friday, March 21, 2014

Join us for a tour of auction highlights

REGISTER NOW Reception: 5:30PM Gallery Walk: 6PM

All are welcome to attend a free event at the Skinner Boston Gallery. Lawrence Kearney, Department Director, will present highlights from the March 22nd Fine Oriental Rugs and Carpets auction.

Skinner Boston Gallery 63 Park Plaza Boston, MA 02116

Reservations 508-970-3240 events@skinnerinc.comRead More

A Well-loved Gagliano Violin Brings $168,000 at Auction

As a violin-maker, I automatically think of the Gagliano family whenever I think of Naples, Italy. Beginning as far back as 1640 with Alessandro Gagliano and ending with Vincenzo Gagliano in the early 1900s, the family produced a remarkable number of fine violins, violas, and cellos. The most prominent personalities of the family, Alessandro, Nicolaus, and Gennaro, emerge in the more important works that bear the Gagliano label.

A Tale of Two Portraits: A Previously Undiscovered Folk Art Painting Brings $252,000 at Auction

I’ve been an appraiser on Antiques Roadshow since the very first episode in Concord, Massachusetts  eighteen  years ago. Now, the Emmy® Award nominated show attracts thousands of people to events in cities around the country. I love meeting these people and seeing what keepsakes they treasure. Some of the items have only sentimental value, but occasionally I find items of real aesthetic or historic value. These are the special objects that have inspired many to take another look at things tucked away in attics and basements.… Read More

Sublime Harmony and the Four Seasons of the Apocalypse

Guest blog post by Dan Elias, director of the New Art Center in Newton, MA. Dan Elias formerly published prints and multiple objects under the imprint Daniel Elias Editions. 

I first met Annette Lemieux in the 1980s, when she was a rising art star in New York and I was director of the Barbara Krakow Gallery in Boston. We became good friends, and worked on a number of projects together. In 1993 she asked if my company, Daniel Elias Editions, would publish her entry in the invitational Music Box Project, organized by Claudia Gould in collaboration with Reuge Music of Sainte-Croix, Switzerland, a maker of musical works for music boxes.… Read More

The Mediterranean Revival Style of Quattro Venti

Designed and furnished in the Mediterranean Revival Style, Quattro Venti is the last great private residence in Annisquam Village, a small fishing hamlet near Gloucester, Massachusetts. Quincy Bent, vice president in charge of production at Bethlehem Steel at the turn of the last century, built the summer retreat around 1912.  His forebears purchased quarries in West Gloucester in 1820 and originally used the property, situated on the tip of the Annisquam peninsula, to transfer stone from river barges to schooners for delivery to cities up and down the East Coast.… Read More

Austrian Bronzes: A Collection of Figurines both Whimsical and Life-Like
Austrian Bronzes | Collectible Figurines

Beginning in the late 19th century, miniature and table top bronze figures crafted in Vienna, Austria drew the attention of collectors in Europe and America. Vividly hand-painted in enamels, these finely detailed figures depicted life-like natural subjects, sometimes in cartoonish, satirical, or whimsical situations. The range of characters include familiar and popular figures, Black Americana, expedition and travel-inspired subjects, elements of the exotic Oriental or near Eastern world, as well as erotic figures.… Read More

From Astronomy to Optics: An Important History of Science Book Collection

I got a phone call last August about a potential book collection. Nothing unusual there, my job allows me the privilege of responding to queries about book collections every day. The description of the collection was brief but promising: about 125 books on the history of science, from the sixteenth to nineteenth century.

I had a few days to ponder the possibilities. I am painfully optimistic, but I tried to temper my enthusiastic imagination.… Read More

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