Skinner Inc.

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Tag Archives: antique weathervanes

Auction Preview: American Furniture & Decorative Arts at Skinner

BOSTON, MA, February 12, 2019 – Skinner will present a live auction of Americana in our Boston Gallery on March 2nd. The auction features 465 lots representing a broad offering of American Furniture, Folk Art, and Decorative Arts from collections across the country.

Presidential Portraits and George Washington

A compelling group of material relating to George Washington, from various consignors, speaks to Washington’s widespread popularity and influence before his death in 1799, and the decades of reverence for his memory after it.… Read More

Americana Exceptionalism

A legacy of beauty, ingenuity, and craftsmanship in Skinner’s August Americana auctions

Skinner’s tradition of notable Americana sales continues with auctions on August 12 & 13 and an online auction August 6-14.  The two-day and online sales comprise nearly 1500 lots of fine American folk art, furniture, ceramics, and maritime antiques.  Day 1 kicks off the auction with two outstanding collections, the Collection of Gail and Don Piatt and the Arthur & Sybil Kern Collection of American Folk Art, Part I.  The Piatt collection features a delightful array of fine country antiques with an emphasis on early New Hampshire painted furniture, samplers, lighting, decorative arts, and painted miniature smalls.  Highlights include:

The Kern collection is encyclopedic in its representation of New England folk art.… Read More

Antique Weathervanes, Part I: Horses, Roosters, and Cars… Oh My!

Collectors of American antiques love weathervanes. In fact, people love them so much that during the 60s and 70s antique weathervanes started disappearing from roofs across America. Thieves were stealing the valuable vanes in the middle of the night. I heard stories of weathervanes being stolen away by helicopter – they swooped down and lifted weathervanes off of barn roofs.

Antique Weathervanes, Part II: Folk Art or Not?

When you see a nice rooster or running horse weathervane with great original surface, you might comment, “What fabulous folk art!” In reality, most antique weathervanes that collectors buy and sell were actually manufactured in large quantities and marketed to the general public. These weathervanes do not fit the traditional definition of folk art, or objects made by a person who wasn’t academically trained working in an isolated area.