Tag Archives: ancient pottery

Fine Ceramics rule the Skinner auctions of European Furniture & Decorative Arts.

Strong interest nationally and internationally for selections of nearly 75 lots of Antiquities and over 700 lots of Wedgwood, most consigned from a New York City estate that had been in storage for more than two decades, contributed to a $1.79M auction that was 94% sold by lot. Competitive and robust internet and telephone bidding drove consistently strong results for the examples of Apulian and Attic red and black figure wares. An Attic black-figure squat amphora sold for $20,000, and an Apulian red-figured volute-krater sold for and $22,500.… Read More

Inspired Design: Encaustic Wedgwood and its Historical Origins

Left: Ancient Apulian Small Volute-krater, c. 380 B.C. (Lot 196, Estimate: $2,500-3,500). Right: Wedgwood Encaustic Decorated Black Basalt Volute Krater Vase, England, 19th century (Lot 302, Estimate: $5,000-10,000)

The Wedgwood factory’s beginnings coincided with discovering the ancient cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum and the blossoming of the neoclassical style based on the architecture, art, and artifacts revealed through archaeological excavations.Read More

From Han to Eternity: The Beauty and Value of Chinese Tomb Pottery

In China, ancient burial sites commonly included tomb pottery. China’s tradition of pottery-making began in ancient times well before the Han dynasty, but by this time, improvements to pottery-making techniques allowed for extensive production of items for both daily and ceremonial use. These sophisticated new techniques eventually led to the three-colored glazed-ware (sancai) of the Tang dynasty as well as low-fired glazed-wares of the Ming and Qing dynasties.… Read More

From Han to Eternity: The Beauty and Value of Chinese Tomb Pottery

In China, during the Han dynasty (206 BC through AD 220), burials commonly included tomb pottery. China’s tradition of pottery-making began in ancient times well before the Han dynasty, but by this time, improvements to pottery-making techniques allowed for extensive production of items for both daily and ceremonial use. These sophisticated new techniques eventually led to the three-colored glazed-ware (sancai) of the Tang dynasty as well as low-fired glazed-wares of the Ming and Qing dynasties.… Read More