Skinner Inc.

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Tag Archives: American Indian Art

Auction of Artifacts from Tribal Cultures Now Open for Bidding 

Ogoni Puppet, Nigeria, Estimate: $3,000-4,000 

MARLBOROUGH, MA – July 5, 2018 – Skinner, Inc. is pleased to announce a Tribal Art online auction, with bidding open through July 11, 2018. With a breadth of material spanning the globe; tribal cultures from American Indian, pre-Columbian, African, Oceanic, South-East Asian, and more are available for bidding in an online auction format. 

The Tribal Art online auction includes significant artifacts from  including Inuit and Northwest Coast tribal groups; from the Amazon; a large number from Africa ranging from ceremonial face masks, figures, weapons and jewelry; a large Oceanic contingent of material from New Guinea jewelry to Polynesian pre-contact stone tools and weapons; and a group of Pre-Columbian ceramic figures and vessels.… Read More

Skinner appoints Michael R. Evans as Director of Tribal Arts – Brings global experience to Boston auction house

BOSTON, MA (November 20, 2017) – Michael Evans joins Skinner as the new Director of Tribal Arts. He brings global experience of many kinds to one of the most international of Skinner’s specialty departments, which offers a rich variety of art, artifacts, and decorative objects from American Indian, African, Inuit, Oceanic and Asian tribal cultures.

Evans was born and raised in New Zealand, where he completed his undergraduate and graduate studies with a concentration in art history.… Read More

The Philip & Patricia Marco Collection: Notable Works of American Indian Art on Auction, February 10

Micmac Beaded and Silk Applique Decorated Woman’s Hood, c. 1840s (Lot 132, Estimate: $20,000-30,000)

BOSTON, MASkinner, Inc. presents The Philip & Patricia Marco Collection, featuring American Indian art. The 132 lots being offered on February 10 in Boston were acquired primarily in the 1980s when the selection was broad. In addition to its high quality, the material in the auction has the attraction of being fresh to the market.… Read More

Skinner to Host an American Indian & Tribal Art Auction Online on January 6

African Carved Wood Ibeji Doll, Yoruba (Lot 50, Estimate $400-$600)

Marlborough, Mass. – December 30, 2014– Skinner, Inc. will hold an auction of American Indian & Tribal Art—Online  beginning January 6, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. EST and concluding on January 15, 2015 at 4:00 p.m. EST. Ideal for both seasoned and new collectors, the sale features a variety of items ranging from Plains Indian beadwork and Navajo jewelry and textiles to New Guinea artifacts and prehistoric stone material.… Read More

Demand for Fine American Indian Artifacts on the Rise

Skinner Grosses $1.7 Million in Latest Auction

BOSTON, Mass. – February 22, 2013 – Skinner, Inc. today announced exceptional results for its recent American Indian & Ethnographic Art sale held on Monday, February 11th. The sale grossed $1,777,912.50, including buyer’s premium, making it the most successful sale that the American Indian & Ethnographic Art department at Skinner has ever experienced.

Bidders competed from the floor, the phones, and over the internet throughout the sale.… Read More

How to Buy American Indian Art: A Guide to Plains Material

American Indian Plains material is one of the most popular and consistently available collecting areas in American Indian art. Plains Indians, including the Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Lakota, Sioux, Crow, Kiowa, and Comanche, populated the continent from Texas to Canada, from west of the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains. While some Plains Indian material was made for the tourist market, many examples were worn and used by Indians themselves, making them all the more desirable.

Pointed Caps and Silver Hat Bands: Intriguing Finds in an Important Penobscot Indian Collection

A Penobscot woman nicknamed Mary Molasses sits staring at the camera, a tall, pointed cap on her head and a large silver brooch adorning her neck. This 1860 photo is a relic of a time when the Penobscot Nation in Maine still spoke its own language and wore traditional clothing made almost entirely from European trade goods.

Navajo Weaving Nets Over $200,000…

I realized the minute I first saw the weaving, with the variegated wool, the browns, all this great character, that this had to be a really early third phase Chief’s blanket. The consignors didn’t have a clue what they had. I told them, “Don’t worry, you’ll be happy.” When they saw the price realized online, they told me they had to look it up five or six times. They didn’t believe it.