Tag Archives: American Indian Art

On View: Tribal Gallery Walk

ONLINE EVENT | THURSDAY, MAY 6 AT 5PM

Join American Indian & Tribal Art department director Michael Evans for an informal virtual tour of the May 12 auction. Michael will highlight items from the current auction, including Northwest Coast, South Pacific, Plains Indian, and Najavo textiles. In the tour, Michael will provide information on the objects and their collectors and answer participant questions.

Please register at the button below.… Read More

The Claflin Serape

The classic serape was the culmination of a century and a half of progress and growth in Navaho textile tradition. The Navajo learned to weave during the latter part of the 17th century from the Pueblos, who had been weaving cotton and other fabrics for hundreds of years. When the Spanish settled in the Southwest (from 1598) they introduced European treadle looms, Churro sheep to supply wool, and blue indigo dye. Churro wool and indigo blue soon became a part of the Pueblo weaving tradition.… Read More

Understanding Navajo Silver Jewelry

The art of silversmithing as practiced by the Navajo, Zuni, and other Pueblo Indians is a relatively recent cultural development. It was not until sometime between 1850 and 1870 that the Navajos acquired the skill of working in silver from the Mexican plateros (silversmiths) they encountered. From the Navajos, the art spread to the Zunis, and to a lesser degree to the other smaller tribes of the Pueblo groups. Although many tribes eventually learned the craft of silversmithing, none have developed it to the level of the Navajo, Zuni and later the Hopi.… Read More

The Mr. and Mrs. James Grievo Collection of Native American Art at Auction on May 18

BOSTON, MA – April 29, 2019 – Skinner is pleased to announce the auction of The Mr. and Mrs. James Grievo Collection of Native American Art to be held in Boston on May 18th. Collectors of Native American art for over 20 years the sale is the culmination of passion and dedication for the culture and objects of Indigenous Americans. A selection of over 550 lots includes paintings, photographs, Plains Indian material, Northwest Coast artifacts, a significant collection of Navajo silver and turquoise jewelry, Southwest weavings and pottery, and an important collection of California and Western baskets.… Read More

Auction of Artifacts from Tribal Cultures Now Open for Bidding 

MARLBOROUGH, MA – July 5, 2018 – Skinner, Inc. is pleased to announce a Tribal Art online auction, with bidding open through July 11, 2018. With a breadth of material spanning the globe; tribal cultures from American Indian, pre-Columbian, African, Oceanic, South-East Asian, and more are available for bidding in an online auction format. 

The Tribal Art online auction includes significant artifacts from  including Inuit and Northwest Coast tribal groups; from the Amazon; a large number from Africa ranging from ceremonial face masks, figures, weapons and jewelry; a large Oceanic contingent of material from New Guinea jewelry to Polynesian pre-contact stone tools and weapons; and a group of Pre-Columbian ceramic figures and vessels.… Read More

Skinner appoints Michael R. Evans as Director of Tribal Arts – Brings global experience to Boston auction house

BOSTON, MA (November 20, 2017) – Michael Evans joins Skinner as the new Director of Tribal Arts. He brings global experience of many kinds to one of the most international of Skinner’s specialty departments, which offers a rich variety of art, artifacts, and decorative objects from American Indian, African, Inuit, Oceanic and Asian tribal cultures.

Evans was born and raised in New Zealand, where he completed his undergraduate and graduate studies with a concentration in art history.… Read More

The Philip & Patricia Marco Collection: Notable Works of American Indian Art on Auction, February 10

BOSTON, MASkinner, Inc. presents The Philip & Patricia Marco Collection, featuring American Indian art. The 132 lots being offered on February 10 in Boston were acquired primarily in the 1980s when the selection was broad. In addition to its high quality, the material in the auction has the attraction of being fresh to the market.

Philip and Patricia Marco formed a film production company in the 1970s which would eventually become one of the premier television production companies in the United States, producing hundreds of award-winning projects.… Read More

Skinner to Host an American Indian & Tribal Art Auction Online on January 6

Marlborough, Mass. – December 30, 2014– Skinner, Inc. will hold an auction of American Indian & Tribal Art—Online  beginning January 6, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. EST and concluding on January 15, 2015 at 4:00 p.m. EST. Ideal for both seasoned and new collectors, the sale features a variety of items ranging from Plains Indian beadwork and Navajo jewelry and textiles to New Guinea artifacts and prehistoric stone material.

Tribal Art

Tribal art offerings include several fine utilitarian items from New Guinea, including Lime containers made of bamboo, gourd, and bone (Lots 28, 29).  … Read More

Demand for Fine American Indian Artifacts on the Rise

Skinner Grosses $1.7 Million in Latest Auction

BOSTON, Mass. – February 22, 2013 – Skinner, Inc. today announced exceptional results for its recent American Indian & Ethnographic Art sale held on Monday, February 11th. The sale grossed $1,777,912.50, including buyer’s premium, making it the most successful sale that the American Indian & Ethnographic Art department at Skinner has ever experienced.

Bidders competed from the floor, the phones, and over the internet throughout the sale.… Read More

How to Buy American Indian Art: A Guide to Plains Material

American Indian Plains material is one of the most popular and consistently available collecting areas in American Indian art. Plains Indians, including the Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Lakota, Sioux, Crow, Kiowa, and Comanche, populated the continent from Texas to Canada, from west of the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains. While some Plains Indian material was made for the tourist market, many examples were worn and used by Indians themselves, making them all the more desirable.

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